Can you substitute mint for Vietnamese mint?

Vietnamese Mint is best used right after being picked. Slightly more sweet than regular mint but can be used as a substitute.

What can you substitute for Vietnamese mint?

Vietnamese coriander, or Vietnamese cilantro, is a heat-loving perennial with slightly spicy, flavorful leaves that are a great culinary substitute for cilantro or mint.

Can you eat Vietnamese mint stems?

The bitter herb is a bit smaller, its leaves have smoother edges, and the stem is smooth. Because of its strong taste, it’s not recommendable to eat this herb raw but you can use it in a lot of soups. It’s also served alongside a traditional Vietnamese hot pot for people who want to add some bitterness in their broth.

Do Vietnamese use cilantro?

Although cilantro is a common ingredient in Viet and other Asian dishes, people who are not familiar with the plant often mistake Vietnamese coriander and long coriander for cilantro. These three herbs are essentially different even though they are all called coriander plants.

What grows well with Vietnamese coriander?

Companion Plants:

Good Companions
Beets Carrots
Cilantro/ Coriander Marigolds
Marjoram Mint
Oregano Parsnips

How often should you water Vietnamese mint?

Plant the stems out at 5 cm intervals. Cover lightly with Yates Seed Raising Mix and water well. Water regularly. Once new leaves emerge, feed weekly with Yates Thrive Vegie and Herb Liquid Plant Food.

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How do you take care of a Vietnamese mint plant?

Vietnamese mint prefers partial sun, but can grow in full sun where there is plenty of water. The plant should never dry out, and grows well even in standing water — often growing in wet pond or stream margins. Soil should be rich, with plenty of nitrogen to fuel leafy growth.

World Southeast Asia